siteverNEW

Truck Geometry

Ever since Randal and Gullwing changed the game with with their “Reverse KingPin” (RKP) design, the standard longboard truck has been quite different to the regular ol’ skate trucks. Understanding the tech can make a big difference to the way your shred sled rolls, so to get the most from your trucks, swat up with our longboard truck geometry guide…

Truck Angle

One of the most defining features of a truck is it’s angle.

Truck angle does not necessarily mean how much a truck turns, but what it does tell you is how much a truck turns when compared to it’s lean.

A “high” angle, around 50 degrees, will lean less for the same turn. In other words, you need to lean less to get the trucks to turn the same.

A “low” angle, less than 44 degrees, will lean more for the same turn. In other words, you need to lean more to get the same turn.

Both “High” and “Low” angle trucks can be set up to turn pretty much the same, but they will feel very different – you’ll be more “on top” of your deck with higher angle, and feel more “surfy” and “leany”with lower angle.

We have two available angles in the Sabre lineup:

  • Choose “high” angle 48 degree Cast or Hollow Baseplates for less lean to turn
  • Choose “low” angle 38 degree Cold Forged Baseplates for more lean to turn
  • Image

Hanger width

You’ll notice that most of our trucks come in different widths. Apart from allowing you to fit trucks to your deck and wheel width, you should know a thing or two about what width does to your skate before you choose which one you want.

Narrow hangers have a little more overall grip, and slide more suddenly. The extreme end of this would be a slalom truck at 100mm wide or so – they grip a lot, but can slide out very suddenly.

Wider hangers have a little less overall grip, and slide more gradually and predictably. The extreme end of this would be a downhill truck at 190mm or even wider – they have a little less grip, but the slide and hookup is a lot more predictable.

We have three widths of RKP hanger:

  • Choose 170mm for maximum grip on technical downhill courses
  • Choose 180mm for the best balance of grip and predictability
  • Choose 190mm for a super smooth slide
  • Image
    Three widths of Forged Precision Hanger - 170mm, 180mm, 190mm

Rake/rakeless

Axle rake (sometimes also called “Axle Offset” or Caster”) determines not how much the truck turns, but how that turn feels.

More Rake gives a “divey” turn. Meaning – as you start to lean the board through the turn, the truck will not turn very much to start with, then it will turn a lot. In other words, the rate of turn becomes greater the more you lean over. Trucks with lots of rake can feel dead in the middle, then very responsive as you “dive” into the turn.

Less Rake gives a “linear” turn. Meaning – as you lean the board through the turn, it will respond straight away and continue to respond the same all the way through its lean.  In other words, the rate of turn is the same, no matter how much you lean over. Trucks with no rake at all can feel smoother and more predictable under your body movements.

The amount of Rake is a very personal choice to most skaters. We have three rake possibilities available in our hangers:

  • Choose Forged Precision 190mm hangers with zero rake, for a very “linear” turn
  • Choose Forged Precision 180 or 170mm hangers with 3mm rake, for a slightly “divey” turn
  • Choose Gravity Cast Standard or Lite hangers with 4.5mm rake, for a very “divey” turn
  • Image
  • Image
  • Image

Bushing seat

Although this isn’t strictly geometry, the bushing seat makes such a huge difference to the way a truck turns that it deserves to be included in this guide.

There are many different shapes and depths of bushing seat, but broadly speaking, it’s the depth you want to pay attention to.

The deeper or more “restrictive” the bushing seat, the more pressure there is on the bushing, and the less the truck will turn. You can compensate for this by running a softer bushing. Restrictive  bushing seats moves the bushing more, which means that changing the duro of your bushings makes less of a difference.

The shallower or more “open” the bushing seat, the less pressure there is on the bushing, and the more the truck will turn. You can compensate for this by running a harder bushing. An open bushing seat lets the bushing do what it wants, which means that changing your duro of your bushings makes a much bigger difference.

We have two distinct bushing seat possibilities on our hangers:

  • Choose Cold Forged Precision hangers for a very open bushing seat
  • Choose Gravity Cast hangers for a more restrictive bushing seat
  • Image
    The more restrictive bushing seat on the Sabre GC Hanger
  • Image
    The open bushing seat on the Sabre Forged Precision Hanger

Get social